Signature Initiative Revealed

The Ladies for Literacy Guild of the Barbara Bush Houston Literacy Foundation revealed a signature initiative during the Power of Literacy Luncheon. Owlbotron and his sidekick, Northtale, will hit the streets next summer in their Curiosity Cruiser. Children in low-income neighborhoods will have amazing learning experiences through this one-of-a-kind mobile library. The Curiosity Cruiser will be a high-tech, mobile library that will gain instant street credibility and become known for its innovative and engaging educational programs. In addition, the Curiosity Cruiser will help children build their own home libraries and provide opportunities for them to participate in reading clubs and other creative activities. They, too, will discover the power literacy has to transform them into the extraordinary and help them reach their dreams. We are confident that Owlbotron and Northtale with their Curiosity Cruiser will be a big hit and make a big impact on low-income children.

From left: Ben Armenta of Credera, Brenda Love of Love Advertising, and Edward Melton of Harris County Public Library at the inaugural Ladies for Literacy Guild Power of Literacy Luncheon.

From left: Ben Armenta of Credera, Brenda Love of Love Advertising, and Edward Melton of Harris County Public Library at the inaugural Ladies for Literacy Guild Power of Literacy Luncheon.

We’d like to recognize guild members Trish Morille and Stephanie Tsuru for their vision for the mobile library. Additionally, we wish to thank the strategic planning consultants at Credera, as well as Brenda Love and her creative team at Love Advertising, who delivered hundreds of pro-bono work to design the cruiser and the characters. We are pleased to partner with Harris County Public Library on this initiative. The generous donors at the Power of Literacy Luncheon made the initiative financially possible, along with a signature sponsor, Phillips 66 and the Tsuru family.

Through the Curiosity Cruiser, we hope to combat low-literacy and decrease statistics like the 60 percent of children that are ill-prepared to learn how to read in kindergarten and the 60 percent that fail to meet minimum academic standards in 3rd grade reading. We must bridge the gap in high-quality, educational resources for economically disadvantaged children and their families in high-need communities. It became clear to the Ladies for Literacy Guild that the key way to achieve these goals was to take programs and services to children and families where they live and where they play, so that access was no longer an issue. Additionally, the Ladies for Literacy Guild recognized how critical it is to create literacy-rich home environments and engage parents in effective reading strategies. We are extraordinarily grateful to the Ladies for Literacy Guild for their leadership and innovation towards piloting such a revolutionary initiative.